Image by Mehmet Turgut Kirkgoz

OBSTETRICS & GYNEACOLOGY

Join local obstetrics and gynaecology surgeons to help provide care to women with obstetric and gynaecology complications. 

ABOUT THIS PLACEMENT

 

 

Age requirement: 18 years + 

Student Intern Requirements: Degree/University/College level minimum third year Medicine/Nursing/Midwifery or Post Graduate i.e Masters or related healthcare studies.

 

Professional Volunteer Requirements: Minimum 12 months work experience in a related field

Number of volunteers: Solo individuals, Groups are welcome

Duration: From 2 weeks to 12 months.

Start date: No specific start date, start at any time during the year.

Fees:

  1. $150 registration fee

  2. Book between 2 weeks and 12 months (see exact fees)

    • Includes accommodation​

    • Placement preparation, facilitation & coordination

    • Airport pick up + drop off

    • Free 1 hour Swahili Language class with an experience professional instructor

  3. Tanzania medical practice fee dependent on placement.

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Your Role 

You will work in alongside the obstetric and gynaecology surgeons and labour and delivery staff to help with pregnant women struggling with complex pregnancies and deliveries. 

 

Procedures performed with our team: 

  • Spinal or IV anaesthesia for C-sections

  • Emergency C-Sections

  • C-Sections and uterine dilation/curettage/evacuation procedures

  • Vacuum assisted deliveries

  • Perineal laceration repair (e.g. 3rd and 4th degree lacerations and obstetric fistulas)

  • Catheterisation

  • Management of fetal malpresentation (external cephalic version or breech delivery)

  • Ultrasounds

  • Neonatal resuscitation

  • Gynaecological examination

  • Management of post delivery gynaecological issues

  • Family planning consultations

  • Normal deliveries

 

Who do we accept:

 

  • Doctors

  • Midwives

  • Students (pre-qualification and post graduate)

  • Nurses

 

The mission

A top priority for the Ministry of Health Tanzania is the country's high infant mortality rate. The government and healthcare teams on the ground are working tirelessly to ensure that babies are delivered safely and live well up to age 5! 

 

The Problem 

According to the WHO 45% of children's deaths under 5 years old were newborns, many only living the first few days after birth! Now more than ever is medical professionals are called to duty beyond their borders. Although fertility remains high across Africa, mothers and babies still struggle to stay healthy and alive. 

 

Now is the time to challenge ourselves as practitioners and help to empower those who do not benefit from medical advancements and knowledge. Contribute your time and support the care of pregnant women and mothers delivering newborns in Arusha Tanzania. Y

 

"Neonatal deaths are inextricably linked to the health of the mother during pregnancy and to the conditions of delivery and newborn care. Close to 8,000 women die every year during pregnancy and child birth as a result of conditions that could have been prevented or treated. Poor quality of care due to an insufficient number of skilled health workers and lack of basic equipment, as well as long distances from home to health care facilities are major deterrents to facility delivery. Women living in rural areas, those who come from the poorest families and those who are less educated, have the least access to skilled attendance at delivery. Women who start having children in adolescence tend to have more children and shorter spacing between pregnancies – all of which are risk factors for maternal and neonatal mortality. The neonatal mortality rate is highest among mothers under-20 years of age at 45 per 1000 live births compared with 29 per 1000 for mothers aged 20 to 29 years.

 

Maternal death rates are closely linked with the high fertility rates and low socio-economic status of women, especially the lack of influence that women have over their own health care or over the daily household budget. According to national statistics, every year over 450 women die from pregnancy related complications for every 100,000 live births. Causes of maternal death include obstetric haemorrhage, unsafe abortions, eclampsia, obstructed labour and infections. Low availability of emergency obstetric and new born care services, chronic shortage of skilled health providers together with a weak referral system contribute to the observed high maternal deaths."-UNICEF 

 

Medi Trip Placements

At Medi Trip we are distinguished in being able to use our healthcare experience and expertise to pick the most suitable settings for our professional volunteers to experience. When you volunteer with Medi Trip, your volunteer placement would have been chosen specifically to suit your area of interest. Each of our 7 placements facilities are carefully assessed and selected for suitability to our professional volunteers, as well as how much contribution goes into the local health and social welfare. 

Medi Trip Placements

Founded and run by a qualified medical professional, Medi Trip is clinically led, medically focused and patient centred. At Medi Trip we are distinguished in being able to use our healthcare experience and expertise to pick the most suitable settings for our professional volunteers to experience. When you volunteer with Medi Trip, your volunteer placement would have been chosen specifically to suit your area of interest. Each of our placements are carefully assessed and selected for suitability to our professional volunteers, as well as how much contribution goes into the local health and social welfare. 

 

So what exactly is medical volunteering? 

It takes truly committed people to this abroad! With medical volunteering, you will be volunteering to work with patients or in a healthcare specific area on a voluntary basis. Unlike other types of volunteering, medical volunteering is a difficult, challenging and profound area. Medical volunteers will witness and experience things other volunteers never will or what they never would have at home. This can be a huge challenge as often times volunteers experience situations that can leave them feeling sad, shocked or confused. But for the most part volunteers are often left amazed at the resilience of their patients and at the skill and dedication of their new colleagues. It truly is a hugely moving experience and one most Medi Trippers never forget.